[ aws . secretsmanager ]

put-secret-value

Description

Creates a new version with a new encrypted secret value and attaches it to the secret. The version can contain a new SecretString value or a new SecretBinary value.

We recommend you avoid calling PutSecretValue at a sustained rate of more than once every 10 minutes. When you update the secret value, Secrets Manager creates a new version of the secret. Secrets Manager removes outdated versions when there are more than 100, but it does not remove versions created less than 24 hours ago. If you call PutSecretValue more than once every 10 minutes, you create more versions than Secrets Manager removes, and you will reach the quota for secret versions.

You can specify the staging labels to attach to the new version in VersionStages . If you don’t include VersionStages , then Secrets Manager automatically moves the staging label AWSCURRENT to this version. If this operation creates the first version for the secret, then Secrets Manager automatically attaches the staging label AWSCURRENT to it .

If this operation moves the staging label AWSCURRENT from another version to this version, then Secrets Manager also automatically moves the staging label AWSPREVIOUS to the version that AWSCURRENT was removed from.

This operation is idempotent. If a version with a VersionId with the same value as the ClientRequestToken parameter already exists, and you specify the same secret data, the operation succeeds but does nothing. However, if the secret data is different, then the operation fails because you can’t modify an existing version; you can only create new ones.

See also: AWS API Documentation

See ‘aws help’ for descriptions of global parameters.

Synopsis

  put-secret-value
--secret-id <value>
[--client-request-token <value>]
[--secret-binary <value>]
[--secret-string <value>]
[--version-stages <value>]
[--cli-input-json | --cli-input-yaml]
[--generate-cli-skeleton <value>]

Options

--secret-id (string)

The ARN or name of the secret to add a new version to.

For an ARN, we recommend that you specify a complete ARN rather than a partial ARN.

If the secret doesn’t already exist, use CreateSecret instead.

--client-request-token (string)

A unique identifier for the new version of the secret.

Note

If you use the Amazon Web Services CLI or one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs to call this operation, then you can leave this parameter empty because they generate a random UUID for you. If you don’t use the SDK and instead generate a raw HTTP request to the Secrets Manager service endpoint, then you must generate a ClientRequestToken yourself for new versions and include that value in the request.

This value helps ensure idempotency. Secrets Manager uses this value to prevent the accidental creation of duplicate versions if there are failures and retries during the Lambda rotation function processing. We recommend that you generate a UUID-type value to ensure uniqueness within the specified secret.

  • If the ClientRequestToken value isn’t already associated with a version of the secret then a new version of the secret is created.

  • If a version with this value already exists and that version’s SecretString or SecretBinary values are the same as those in the request then the request is ignored. The operation is idempotent.

  • If a version with this value already exists and the version of the SecretString and SecretBinary values are different from those in the request, then the request fails because you can’t modify a secret version. You can only create new versions to store new secret values.

This value becomes the VersionId of the new version.

--secret-binary (blob)

The binary data to encrypt and store in the new version of the secret. To use this parameter in the command-line tools, we recommend that you store your binary data in a file and then pass the contents of the file as a parameter.

You must include SecretBinary or SecretString , but not both.

You can’t access this value from the Secrets Manager console.

--secret-string (string)

The text to encrypt and store in the new version of the secret.

You must include SecretBinary or SecretString , but not both.

We recommend you create the secret string as JSON key/value pairs, as shown in the example.

--version-stages (list)

A list of staging labels to attach to this version of the secret. Secrets Manager uses staging labels to track versions of a secret through the rotation process.

If you specify a staging label that’s already associated with a different version of the same secret, then Secrets Manager removes the label from the other version and attaches it to this version. If you specify AWSCURRENT , and it is already attached to another version, then Secrets Manager also moves the staging label AWSPREVIOUS to the version that AWSCURRENT was removed from.

If you don’t include VersionStages , then Secrets Manager automatically moves the staging label AWSCURRENT to this version.

(string)

Syntax:

"string" "string" ...

--cli-input-json | --cli-input-yaml (string) Reads arguments from the JSON string provided. The JSON string follows the format provided by --generate-cli-skeleton. If other arguments are provided on the command line, those values will override the JSON-provided values. It is not possible to pass arbitrary binary values using a JSON-provided value as the string will be taken literally. This may not be specified along with --cli-input-yaml.

--generate-cli-skeleton (string) Prints a JSON skeleton to standard output without sending an API request. If provided with no value or the value input, prints a sample input JSON that can be used as an argument for --cli-input-json. Similarly, if provided yaml-input it will print a sample input YAML that can be used with --cli-input-yaml. If provided with the value output, it validates the command inputs and returns a sample output JSON for that command.

See ‘aws help’ for descriptions of global parameters.

Examples

Example 1: To store a new secret value in a secret

The following put-secret-value example creates a new version of a secret with two key-value pairs.

aws secretsmanager put-secret-value \
    --secret-id MyTestSecret \
    --secret-string "{\"user\":\"diegor\",\"password\":\"VCsdUbPX!bcu]N\"KEnm||:3Bp3$IBOS\"}"

Output:

{
    "ARN": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:us-west-2:123456789012:secret:MyTestSecret-1a2b3c",
    "Name": "MyTestSecret",
    "VersionId": "a1b2c3d4-5678-90ab-cdef-EXAMPLE11111",
    "VersionStages": [
        "AWSCURRENT"
    ]
}

For more information, see Modify a secret in the Secrets Manager User Guide.

Example 2: To store a new secret value from credentials in a JSON file

The following put-secret-value example creates a new version of a secret from credentials in a file. For more information, see Loading AWS CLI parameters from a file in the AWS CLI User Guide.

aws secretsmanager put-secret-value \
    --secret-id MyTestSecret \
    --secret-string file://mycreds.json

Contents of mycreds.json:

{
  "engine": "mysql",
  "username": "saanvis",
  "password": "i29wwX!%9wFV",
  "host": "my-database-endpoint.us-west-2.rds.amazonaws.com",
  "dbname": "myDatabase",
  "port": "3306"
}

Output:

{
    "ARN": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:us-west-2:123456789012:secret:MyTestSecret-a1b2c3",
    "Name": "MyTestSecret",
    "VersionId": "a1b2c3d4-5678-90ab-cdef-EXAMPLE11111",
    "VersionStages": [
        "AWSCURRENT"
    ]
}

For more information, see Modify a secret in the Secrets Manager User Guide.

Output

ARN -> (string)

The ARN of the secret.

Name -> (string)

The name of the secret.

VersionId -> (string)

The unique identifier of the version of the secret.

VersionStages -> (list)

The list of staging labels that are currently attached to this version of the secret. Secrets Manager uses staging labels to track a version as it progresses through the secret rotation process.

(string)